Ontario's SIU investigating after fatal shooting during poli

When police officers are involved in incidents where someone has been seriously injured, dies or alleges sexual assault, the Special Investigations Unit has the statutory mandate to conduct independent investigations to determine whether a criminal offence took place.

Ontario's SIU investigating after fatal shooting during poli

Postby Thomas » Fri Jun 28, 2024 2:38 pm

Ontario's SIU investigating after fatal shooting during police response to Anicinabe Park fire in Kenora

SIU says OPP officer fatally shot a man during incident at Anicinabe Park

The Special Investigations Unit (SIU) is investigating Ontario Provincial Police's response to a fire in Kenora, saying an OPP officer fatally shot a man in Kenora's Anicinabe Park.

Officials have provided few details on what happened at the park, but on Tuesday evening, the SIU confirmed to CBC News it became involved after the man was shot.

Emergency personnel were on the scene and "working through the incident" at around 4 p.m. Tuesday, according to an initial Facebook post from the City of Kenora's page. It also said it had asked the public to remain away from the area and use alternative routes as much as possible, as the beach, boat launch and public park area have been closed.

OPP issued a statement saying one person "suffered injuries and was transported to hospital by Emergency Medical Services."

The police then notified the SIU, which invoked its mandate to investigate what happened.

The independent government agency investigates conduct of police that may have resulted in death, serious injury, sexual assault or the discharge of a firearm at a person.

OPP did not specify how the individual was hurt.

Gunshots heard

Two people told CBC News they were at the park and heard gunshots fired.

"We were kind of like watching the fire trucks and all of a sudden, we heard three gunshots go off, boom, boom, boom," Tracy Arvelin said. "That really scared me."

Rachel Hall said something similar, noting she was driving by the scene when she heard three gunshots.

Anicinabe Park said in a Facebook post that its staff members were unharmed during the incident.

The City of Kenora said in a Facebook update that the police investigation of the scene at the park was expected to last into Wednesday or Thursday.

The main entrance to the park will be closed off to traffic while that investigation is ongoing, but the secondary exit will be open to allow park visitors to get in and out.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder- ... -1.7246193
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SIU investigating after man fatally shot by OPP in Kenora pa

Postby Thomas » Fri Jun 28, 2024 2:43 pm

SIU investigating after man fatally shot by OPP in Kenora park; general store 'total loss’ following blaze

Ontario’s Special Investigations Unit (SIU) is investigating after Ontario Provincial Police fatally shot a man in a Kenora, Ont. RV park.

SIU is only sharing that a man was fatally shot, and an investigation is ongoing.

This comes as the general store in the city’s Anciniabe RV Park and Campground burned during a noon hour fire Tuesday.

“It would appear from my initial assessment that the fire started inside the store, rose vertically into the attic space, and then extended from there,” said Kenora Fire Chief Dave Pratt, “The building is a total loss.”

Susan Evenden, one of the campground's operators, said the building contained office supplies and ice cream.

The cause of the fire remains under investigation.

https://winnipeg.ctvnews.ca/siu-investi ... -1.6940603
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First Nations man killed in Kenora OPP shooting remembered a

Postby Thomas » Fri Jun 28, 2024 2:46 pm

First Nations man killed in Kenora OPP shooting remembered as avid outdoorsman, generous as SIU investigates

A man shot and killed by an Ontario Provincial Police officer in Kenora earlier this week is being described by his family and First Nation as an avid outdoorsman who shared his harvest.

Bruce Wallace Frogg was a member of Wawakapewin, an Oji-Cree First Nation and remote fly-in community about 350 kilometres north of Sioux Lookout.

Ontario's Special Investigations Unit (SIU) is investigating the circumstances surrounding the death of Frogg, who was in his 50s. The SIU is an independent government agency tasked with investigating police conduct that may have resulted in death, serious injury, sexual assault or the discharge of a firearm at a person.

Kenora OPP located a man with knives at Anicinabe Park in Kenora around 12:40 p.m. Tuesday. An officer shot him after the man set fire to a building, the SIU said in a statement issued Wednesday.

The man, identified by his community as Bruce, was taken to hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

"Three investigators and two forensic investigators have been assigned to the case. The post-mortem is scheduled for Saturday. One subject official and seven witness officials have been designated at this time," the release said.

Firefighters extinguished the blaze, but the building was a total loss.

"Bruce can be remembered by his teachings and stories about the land," says a statement issued Wednesday from Wawakapewin First Nation. He was related to Wawakapewin's Chief AnneMarie Beardy, and leaves behind siblings, children and many relatives.

Days before Frogg's death, Anicinabe Park looked much different; people gathered there to mark National Indigenous Peoples Day and the 50th anniversary of the park's occupation by young First Nations people protesting for better living conditions, education and access to land.

'I was very, extremely proud of him'

Joshua Frogg, Bruce's older brother, said he and his siblings played hockey together growing up, and spent a lot of time on the land. He described Bruce as an expert hunter and outdoorsman who always shared his bounty with others.

Bruce overcame much adversity, being a survivor of convicted ex-priest and scoutmaster Ralph Rowe, and dealing with addiction, Joshua said. Bruce's family members, including his father and other siblings, attended residential school.

We love him, we will miss him, and he was a caring, generous person who provided for the community, for the elders. - Joshua Frogg, Bruce's brother

Bruce had been sober for over a year and was living at a halfway house in Kenora, said Joshua, who visited him as much as he could.

"I was very, extremely proud of him. He's come a long way," said Joshua, the band administrator for Wapekeka First Nation.

"We love him, we will miss him, and he was a caring, generous person who provided for the community, for the elders."

Tragedy could have been prevented

Kiiwetinoong MPP Sol Mamakwa said the stark contrast between the ceremony at Anicinabe Park on Friday and what happened there this week is hard to bear.

"Days later, in the same spot, you kill one of us. It doesn't feel good," Mamakwa said.

Mamakwa extended his condolences to Bruce's friends and family. His death is another reminder of the need for better mental health supports for First Nations people and de-escalation training for police, he said.

"When we talk about First Nations people not being treated with the same care by the police … I'm always [of] the belief that this tragedy that happened was preventable."

He said he hopes the SIU investigation provides answers for the family.

Strain on resources

Nearly a quarter of Kenora's population is Indigenous, according to the 2021 census.

Patti Fairfield, executive director of the Ne-Chee Friendship Centre in Kenora, said there are mental health services in the city, but staff shortages are putting a strain on resources.

"If you're dealing with somebody in a crisis situation … it's not like five to 10 minutes; sometimes it can take a long time, which just puts a backlog on other individuals who are needing to see these types of workers," Fairfield said.

"It's like a domino effect of how the resources are here, but there's not enough manpower to cover what is needed here."

The city is a central hub for justice and health-care services, but when wait times are long, people may fall through the cracks, she said.

"Even though we're trying to do the best that we can to support people, at the end of the day, there's still people out there that aren't getting what they need," Fairfield said.

Creating supportive spaces

Elauna Boutwell is involved with Kenora Moving Forward, a grassroots coalition that helps the city's most vulnerable people. She has heard a lot of concerns following Bruce's death and said it can be challenging for people to know where to go for help.

There's also the issue of stigma; CBC News observed a number of graphic and racially charged comments on social media in response to the incident at Anicinabe Park, and Boutwell said that may deter others from seeking help.

Mamakwa also called those comments "disturbing and very disappointing."

"It creates this really unsafe environment to be open about and their mental health challenges or their addiction challenges," Boutwell said.

She wants to see more wraparound support in the community that empowers people with a stronger sense of self-worth.

"Part of that's creating safe spaces, trusting relationships, rapport with counsellors or whoever, so that it's not just in those crisis moments when we're interacting with individuals, but we can be creating this whole environment around someone so that it is safe for them to reach out," Boutwell said.

The SIU urges anyone who may have information about the investigation, including video or photos, to contact the lead investigator at 1-800-787-8529 or online.

https://www.cbc.ca/lite/story/1.7248955
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First Nations man killed in Kenora OPP shooting remembered a

Postby Thomas » Wed Jul 03, 2024 5:09 am

First Nations man killed in Kenora OPP shooting remembered as avid outdoorsman, generous as SIU investigates

A man shot and killed by an Ontario Provincial Police officer in Kenora earlier this week is being described by his family and First Nation as an avid outdoorsman who shared his harvest.

Bruce Wallace Frogg was a member of Wawakapewin, an Oji-Cree First Nation and remote fly-in community about 350 kilometres north of Sioux Lookout.

Ontario's Special Investigations Unit (SIU) is investigating the circumstances surrounding the death of Frogg, who was in his 50s. The SIU is an independent government agency tasked with investigating police conduct that may have resulted in death, serious injury, sexual assault or the discharge of a firearm at a person.

Kenora OPP located a man with knives at Anicinabe Park in Kenora around 12:40 p.m. Tuesday. An officer shot him after the man set fire to a building, the SIU said in a statement issued Wednesday.

The man, identified by his community as Bruce, was taken to hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

"Three investigators and two forensic investigators have been assigned to the case. The post-mortem is scheduled for Saturday. One subject official and seven witness officials have been designated at this time," the release said.

Firefighters extinguished the blaze, but the building was a total loss.

"Bruce can be remembered by his teachings and stories about the land," says a statement issued Wednesday from Wawakapewin First Nation. He was related to Wawakapewin's Chief AnneMarie Beardy, and leaves behind siblings, children and many relatives.

Days before Frogg's death, Anicinabe Park looked much different; people gathered there to mark National Indigenous Peoples Day and the 50th anniversary of the park's occupation by young First Nations people protesting for better living conditions, education and access to land.

'I was very, extremely proud of him'

Joshua Frogg, Bruce's older brother, said he and his siblings played hockey together growing up, and spent a lot of time on the land. He described Bruce as an expert hunter and outdoorsman who always shared his bounty with others.

Bruce overcame much adversity, being a survivor of convicted ex-priest and scoutmaster Ralph Rowe, and dealing with addiction, Joshua said. Bruce's family members, including his father and other siblings, attended residential school.

Bruce had been sober for over a year and was living at a halfway house in Kenora, said Joshua, who visited him as much as he could.

"I was very, extremely proud of him. He's come a long way," said Joshua, the band administrator for Wapekeka First Nation.

"We love him, we will miss him, and he was a caring, generous person who provided for the community, for the elders."

Tragedy could have been prevented

Kiiwetinoong MPP Sol Mamakwa said the stark contrast between the ceremony at Anicinabe Park on Friday and what happened there this week is hard to bear.

"Days later, in the same spot, you kill one of us. It doesn't feel good," Mamakwa said.

Mamakwa extended his condolences to Bruce's friends and family. His death is another reminder of the need for better mental health supports for First Nations people and de-escalation training for police, he said.

"When we talk about First Nations people not being treated with the same care by the police … I'm always [of] the belief that this tragedy that happened was preventable."

He said he hopes the SIU investigation provides answers for the family.

Strain on resources

Nearly a quarter of Kenora's population is Indigenous, according to the 2021 census.

"If you're dealing with somebody in a crisis situation … it's not like five to 10 minutes; sometimes it can take a long time, which just puts a backlog on other individuals who are needing to see these types of workers," Fairfield said.

"It's like a domino effect of how the resources are here, but there's not enough manpower to cover what is needed here."

The city is a central hub for justice and health-care services, but when wait times are long, people may fall through the cracks, she said.

"Even though we're trying to do the best that we can to support people, at the end of the day, there's still people out there that aren't getting what they need," Fairfield said.

Creating supportive spaces

Elauna Boutwell is involved with Kenora Moving Forward, a grassroots coalition that helps the city's most vulnerable people. She has heard a lot of concerns following Bruce's death and said it can be challenging for people to know where to go for help.

There's also the issue of stigma; CBC News observed a number of graphic and racially charged comments on social media in response to the incident at Anicinabe Park, and Boutwell said that may deter others from seeking help.

"It creates this really unsafe environment to be open about and their mental health challenges or their addiction challenges," Boutwell said.

She wants to see more wraparound support in the community that empowers people with a stronger sense of self-worth.

"Part of that's creating safe spaces, trusting relationships, rapport with counsellors or whoever, so that it's not just in those crisis moments when we're interacting with individuals, but we can be creating this whole environment around someone so that it is safe for them to reach out," Boutwell said.

The SIU urges anyone who may have information about the investigation, including video or photos, to contact the lead investigator at 1-800-787-8529 or online.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder- ... -1.7248955
Mamakwa also called those comments "disturbing and very disappointing."
Patti Fairfield, executive director of the Ne-Chee Friendship Centre in Kenora, said there are mental health services in the city, but staff shortages are putting a strain on resources.
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First Nations man killed in Kenora OPP shooting remembered a

Postby Thomas » Wed Jul 03, 2024 5:10 am

Police say Bruce Wallace Frogg was holding knives when they shot him

A man shot and killed by an Ontario Provincial Police officer in Kenora earlier this week is being described by his family and First Nation as an avid outdoorsman who shared his harvest.

Bruce Wallace Frogg was a member of Wawakapewin, an Oji-Cree First Nation and remote fly-in community about 350 kilometres north of Sioux Lookout.

Ontario’s Special Investigations Unit (SIU) is investigating the circumstances surrounding the death of Frogg, who was in his 50s. The SIU is an independent government agency tasked with investigating police conduct that may have resulted in death, serious injury, sexual assault or the discharge of a firearm at a person.

Kenora OPP located a man with knives at Anicinabe Park in Kenora around 12:40 p.m. Tuesday. An officer shot him after the man set fire to a building, the SIU said in a statement issued Wednesday.

https://nationtalk.ca/story/first-natio ... igates-cbc
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